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The spread of amphibian chytrid fungus through western Panama. Eastern Panama is the last remaining mountainous region in the Neotropics that hasn’t been affected. (Data from Karen Lips)

 

A scanning electron micrograph of diseased amphibian skin with several protruding Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis spore discharge tubes.

Photo Credit: Lee Berger, James Cook University

 

Smithsonian Scientist Matt Evans rescues frogs in western Panama as part of the emergency response to news of chytrid related die-offs in that area.

Photo Credit: Smithsonian’s National Zoo

 

Heidi Griffth (left), from the El Valle Amphibian Rescue Center, shows Steve Monfort (right), acting director of the Smithsonian’s National Zoo, the collection of amphibians rescued in western Panama.

Photo Credit: Brian Gratwicke, Smithsonian’s National Zoo

 

Oris Sanjur, of the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute’s genetics lab, explains how the lab will be used to test samples for the presence of chytrid fungus.

Photo Credit: Brian Gratwicke, Smithsonian’s National Zoo

 

Installation of the first amphibian rescue pod at Summit Park is the first part of the new amphibian rescue center under constructed for amphibians from eastern Panama.

Photo Credit: Paul Crump, Houston Zoo

 

Panama’s national animal, the Panamanian golden frog (Atelopus zeteki) is now probably extinct in the wild. The team is working to develope a cure for the fungus so that one day these animals can be reintroduced into the wild.

Photo Credit: Brian Gratwicke, Smithsonian’s National Zoo

 

Atelopus certus, an amphibian endemic to mountains in eastern Panama, is highly vulnerable to chytridiomycosis and is an important target species for rescue. Most other harlequin frog species have experienced severe population crashes and more than 30 species have not been seen in the last eight years and are believed to be extinct.

Photo Credit: Cesar Jaramillo, Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute

 

The lemur leaf frog (Hylomantis lemur) is highly vulnerable to chytridiomycosis in the wild, but it is currently breeding well in captivity.

Photo Credit: Cesar Jaramillo, Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute

 

Atelopus glyphus, an amphibian from the Darien mountains in eastern Panama, appears to have healthy numbers, but is an important target species for rescue.

Photo Credit: Andrew Crawford, Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute

 

The ghost glass frog (Centrolene ilex) is declining rapidly in some parts of its range.

Photo Credit: Cesar Jaramillo, Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute

 

Hemiphractus fasciatus is a rare species of frog from undisturbed humid lowland and montane forests that eats other frogs and broods its eggs on its back.

Photo Credit: Paul Crump, Houston Zoo

 

Yellow-flecked Glassfrog (Cochranella albomaculata), a moderate priority species that is widely distributed, has declined rapidly in some areas.

Photo Credit: Roberto Ibáñez, Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute

 

The horned marsupial frog (Gastrotheca cornuta), carries her eggs in a pouch on her back. This species has been extirpated from Costa Rica and western Panama due to chytridiomycosis.

Photo Credit: Cesar Jaramillo, Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute

 

Pristimantis moro is a rare species that lives in montane forest canopies.

Photo Credit: Cesar Jaramillo, Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute

 

Craugastor tabasarae is a very endangered species and one of the highest priorities for rescue. It is extirpated from western Panama, and the status eastern Panamanian populations is unclear.

Photo Credit: Cesar Jaramillo, Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute

 

A poison dart frog (Dendrobates fulguritus) is a striking frog with metallic green stripes. It is a moderate priority for rescue

Photo Credit: Cesar Jaramillo, Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute

 

Hyloscirtus colymba is a very high priority species that has disappeared from western Panama and wild eastern Panamanian populations are our last chance to establish some of these animals in captivity before they go extinct.

Photo Credit: Cesar Jaramillo, Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute

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